Above & Beyond Tree Service LLC wins 2019 Angie’s List Super Service Award!

Above & Beyond Tree Service LLC wins 2019 Angie's List Super Service Award!

 

We are once again honored by the continued support of our amazing customers, that voted for us to win Angie’s List Super Service Award in 2019, making it the 9th consecutive year!

 

Award reflects company’s consistently high level of customer service

 

{Smithfield, RI, January 2020} – Above & Beyond Tree Service LLC is proud to announce that it has earned the home service industry’s coveted Angie’s List Super Service Award (SSA). This award honors service professionals who have maintained exceptional service ratings and reviews on Angie’s List in 2019.

“Service pros that receive our Angie’s List Super Service Award represent the best in our network, who are consistently making great customer service their mission,” said Angie’s List Founder Angie Hicks. “These pros have provided exceptional service to our members and absolutely deserve recognition for the exemplary customer service they exhibited in the past year.”

Angie’s List Super Service Award 2019 winners have met strict eligibility requirements, which include maintaining an “A” rating in overall grade, recent grade and review period grade. The SSA winners must be in good standing with Angie’s List and undergo additional screening.

Geoff Mongeon, owner and operator of Above & Beyond Tree Service LLC is always keen to thank his loyal customers for the entrusted honor of winning the coveted award.

Above & Beyond Tree Service LLC has been listed on Angie’s List since 2010. This is the 9th year Above & Beyond Tree Service LLC has received this honor.

Service company ratings are updated continually on Angie’s List as new, verified consumer reviews are submitted. Companies are graded on an A through F scale in multiple fields ranging from price to professionalism to punctuality.

For over two decades Angie’s List has been a trusted name for connecting consumers to top-rated service professionals. Angie’s List provides unique tools and support designed to improve the local service experience for both consumers and service professionals.

Tree Damage Insurance Guidelines

If you have experienced damage because of a storm, we have prepared this handy infographic that will help you identify if your insurance will cover for it.


Disclaimer: This is not legal advice. All insurance policies are written differently and your policy coverage could differ from the conclusions on this graphic. Please contact your local attorney for specific guidance. Above & Beyond Tree Service LLC is not responsible for conclusions drawn as a result of this infographic.

ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE, LLC Earns Esteemed 2017 Angie’s List Super Service Award

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ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE, LLC Earns Esteemed 2017 Angie’s List Super Service Award
Award reflects company’s consistently high level of customer service

 

Smithfield, Rhode Island, January 2018  – Above & Beyond Tree Service, LLC is proud to announce that it has earned the home service industry’s coveted Angie’s List Super Service Award (SSA). This award honors service professionals who have maintained exceptional service ratings and reviews on Angie’s List in 2017.

“The service providers that receive our Angie’s List Super Service Award demonstrate the level of excellence that members have come to expect,” said Angie’s List Founder Angie Hicks. “These pros are top-notch and absolutely deserve recognition for the trustworthy and exemplary customer service they exhibited in the past year and overall.”

Angie’s List Super Service Award 2017 winners have met strict eligibility requirements, which include maintaining an “A” rating in overall grade, recent grade and review period grade. The SSA winners must be in good standing with Angie’s List, pass a background check, record a current trade license attestation and abide by Angie’s List operational guidelines.

“At Above & Beyond Tree Service, LLC we work tirelessly to provide the highest level of service to our customers. Above all, we want to earn their friendship and continued business, and make sure they deal with a local business that knows about them in the closest of ways.”, says  Owner and operator, Geoff Mongeon.

Above & Beyond Tree Service, LLC has been listed on Angie’s List since 2011. This is the 7th year Above & Beyond Tree Service, LLC has received this honor.

Service company ratings are updated continually on Angie’s List as new, verified consumer reviews are submitted. Companies are graded on an A through F scale in multiple fields ranging from price to professionalism to punctuality.

For over two decades Angie’s List has been a trusted name for connecting consumers to top-rated service professionals. Angie’s List provides unique tools and support designed to improve the local service experience for both consumers and service professionals.

 

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For over two decades, Angie’s List has provided trusted reviews and information to help millions of consumers make smart hiring decisions. Angie’s List offers more than 10 million verified reviews in over 700 service categories, providing its members a credible resource for researching and comparing local service providers. Angie’s List is based in Indianapolis, Indiana and is an operating business of ANGI Homeservices (NASDAQ:ANGI).

Contact:

Steffanie Finkiewicz

Angie’s List

303-963-8384

mediarelations@angieslist.com

GYPSY MOTHS IN YOUR TREES? Please read.

As the Providence Journal reports, the next infestation of gypsy moth caterpillars is about to begin.

The voracious, leaf-eating caterpillars are hatching from egg masses laid during last year’s infestation, which was the worst in Rhode Island since the early 1980s. More than half of the state’s forestland was defoliated by hordes of caterpillars.

If your beautiful trees have been affected by last year’s infestation or you want to do some preventive treatment, we would like to recommend for you to contact Ingmar at Aspenn Environmental Services. His direct phone line is (401) – 453-4200. You can click here to visit the official website.

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To learn more about the gypsy moth, we recommend reading this article from the Department of Environmental Management in RI.

We’d like to remind you that Above and Beyond does not provide tree spraying services of any kind.

Thanks for your continued business,

 

Geoff.

What to do & NOT to do after a snow storm!

What to do & NOT to do after a snow storm!

Here are a few tips Above and Beyond Tree Service has gathered from the last storm that may help protect you and your property.

1) Do not let children play under trees with accumulating snow,
2) Try to avoid parking vehicles or other valuable assets under snow packed trees. Some of the trees more prone to heavy snow damage are all pines, birches, poplars and maples, but please note any tree can break under stress.
3) During the storm, gently bang off any of the snow that has accumulated on ornamental trees.
4) If tree damage does occur on your property, call a professional to assist with the removal. There are a lot of hidden dangers associated with storm damaged trees.

If you need help, do not hesitate to contact us.

Geoff.

Celebrating our 10th year anniversary… and 5 consecutive years of award winning service!

When we started Above & Beyond Tree Service, we knew we wanted to provide amazing, dedicated customer satisfaction and the highest quality tree work there is.

Well, it all looks like yesterday!

2016 marks our first 10 years in business, and we are deeply honored to have been voted for the 5th consecutive year in a row for Angie’s List Super Service Award!

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It was always our BIG dream… and dreams do come true. Today, as with day one, we don’t forget our humble beginnings and our BIG aspirations.

Thanks yet again for depositing your trust in our company. We will work even harder to make sure that when it comes to tree care, we always go ABOVE & BEYOND your expectations.

Sincerely,

Geoff Mongeon
Owner & Operator.

ABOVE & BEYOND RECEIVES ANGIE’S LIST 2014 SERVICE AWARD

We have an amazingly dedicated team that strives to deliver the highest quality tree work in RI.
Above & Beyond Tree Service was awarded (for the 4th consecutive year) the Angie’s List Super Service Award.
We are honored to receive Rhode Islander’s badge of trust! A special “thank you” to our customers that made this happen, and to our hard working team that goes above and beyond!

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ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE wins ANGIE’S LIST award recognition for third year in a row!

We are humbled once again by our customer’s recognition. We work hard and diligently to exceed the needs of our customers and friends. To receive this badge of honor for the third year in a row is a privilege. If you are interested today in award winning tree service, call us today at 401-529-4903 and experience the ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE difference!
Share with a friend that you know needs tree care!

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Get a head start to the cold! Try our FIREWOOD.

As with all of our services, our goal is to provide our customers with the highest quality product.

We primarily sell two types of processed firewood: seasoned and semi-seasoned. Both are processed from locally cut hardwood trees and cut into 16” to 18” pieces and split 3” to 8” wide.

We proudly serve and deliver (without a delivery surcharge) our premium firewood to all Northern RI towns, including but not limited to, Burrillville (East of RT 102), Cumberland, Greenville, Lincoln, Johnston, N. Providence, Pawtucket, N. Smithfield, Smithfield and Woonsocket.

Below is our current pricing and may change depending on demand and other variable cost.
These prices include delivery; however, a surcharge may be added to deliveries outside of our territory.

Seasoned processed hardwood = $285/cord
Semi-seasoned processed hardwood = $265/cord
Unprocessed hardwood logs = $175/truck load
Wood Stacking Fees = $75/cord

ORDER TODAY AND EXPERIENCE THE ABOVE & BEYOND DIFFERENCE!

Tree Care Industry Association Standards

Above & Beyond Tree Service never stops improving and delivering the highest quality Tree Service.

We are members of the TREE CARE INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (TCIA) since 2010, which means you can rest and have the peace of mind you deserve when placing that tree work in the hands of true dedicated professionals.

From the TCIA website:
“TCIA Accreditation gives the commercial tree care company a means of evaluating itself against industry standards and best business practices, pinpointing both areas of excellence and areas where improvement is needed. By working on problem areas, businesses can improve their bottom-line numbers while motivating employees to be safer and more efficient.

TCIA Accreditation also helps commercial tree care companies create and maintain industry-standard, safety-training programs. As a result, industry safety improves and accident rates become lower for accredited companies and the industry as a whole.

TCIA Accreditation gives consumers a practical, viable means to identify tree care companies that are trustworthy in their business, arboriculture, and safety practices. Government agencies will also have a means of easily recognizing companies that meet industry standards for safety and quality performance.

Remember next time you are shopping for tree care — You deserve quality work. Contact Above & Beyond Tree Service for a quote today!

New MOBILE website is up to serve you better!

ABOVE & BEYOND Tree Services is proud to announce the latest web addition… Our new MOBILE WEBSITE is ready for all customers and visitors to have a great experience on their phones!
Designed for our customers and visitors “on the go”, it takes advantage of the mobile mindset to provide a tailored version that enhances the user experience in such a device.
Visit today using your smartphone! Same URL address, different destination based on your device. It’s that simple.
www.aboveandbeyond-treeservice.com
We’d love to hear your feedback!!

new mobile website

ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE!

As part of our ongoing commitment to serve you above and beyond your expectations, we just launched our new website. We hope you enjoy the new look, and the much improved photography. Feel free to leave us comments in our FACEBOOK page:

Geoff.

FALL FERTILIZATION: Should I fertilize, and if so when?

If you have Elm, Ash, Bottle, Eucalyptus, Queen Palms and many other species of trees, the fall is a great time to have them fertilized.
While soil often has sufficient levels of essential plant nutrients such as iron, zinc and other trace nutrients, the soil pH needs to be considered as well. If too high, it makes these essential plant nutrients unavailable. Deep Root Fertilization provides a way for trees to receive the nutrients they need.

There are many kinds of fertilizers. We recommend and use an extended- release nitrogen that breaks down slowly and provides sustained plant nutrition over as long as nine months. This also prevents fertilizer burn, and reduces the labor costs of multiple applications. If you do not use a slow release fertilizer you will usually need to fertilize several times per year. Typically we recommend Root Feeding, or injecting fertilizer into the ground throughout the root system. The best time to do this is usually February – March. If your trees are struggling from nutrient deficiencies, it often makes sense to fertilize them again in the Fall. In our mild winter climate, trees experience a longer growing season than in colder climates. Fertilizing in the fall can lead to more vigorous root growth throughout the cooler months. This enables trees to get a better start on their spring growth.

So, if you have not fertilized your trees this year, or if you did not use a slow release fertilizer, or have concerns about the health of any of your trees, please call us to assess your trees and provide you with fertilization recommendations.

At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

SPRING TREE CARE

source: http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/4DMG/Trees/
By Steven Cramer, Horticulture Agent, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension

How can the homeowner keep shrubs and trees healthy during the spring and throughout the year?

For an answer to this question, it’s important to know something about the needs of healthy plants. Facts to consider include a plant’s capacity to make and store carbohydrates, enough soil moisture, and soil that has adequate nutrients and is conducive to plant growth.

Capacity to make and store nutrients: This is important to all plants and it is not as simple as it may seem. Each perennial plant must be able to store adequate carbohydrates, not only to reproduce leaves for each year, but also to “hold in escrow” the energy needed to grow new leaves, if they are killed by frost or destroyed by wind or hail.

If graphed, the carbohydrate storage curve would be high in early spring, just before trees leaf out. After leaf-out, it would plunge (because the tree has used a lot of stored food energy to put on new leaves). Then, in midsummer or later, the curve would rise again, as the tree begins to build new food stores.

Trees and shrubs use stored nutrients in early spring. By the end of spring, after a tremendous growth spurt, trees have used up a lot of these nutrients. A healthy tree will begin, through the process of photosynthesis, making new supplies of nutrients (carbohydrates).

Though summer is hot, the healthy plant will continue to make and store nutrients sufficient to carry it through the winter. In fall, plants begin to lose their leaves and go dormant for winter, and the tree’s food-making capacities slow down.

By knowing this cycle, it becomes apparent that the plant must be healthy enough to manufacture, store and use adequate nutrients throughout the year. If it isn’t, you will end up with dead branches or even a dead tree. In some cases, a tree may have just enough food stored to begin leafing out, but not enough to continue growing. In that case, the tree will die. Proper plant care, year-round, should prevent this from happening.

Soil moisture: Too little or too much moisture will result in a tree dying back or dying off. As a rule of thumb, soil needs to be moist to between 12 to 18 inches of depth for most trees and shrubs. The only way to check moisture depth is to check by careful digging or by using a soil probe after watering the root area.

Don’t assume you are watering a tree when you are watering your lawn. Most of the water may go to the lawn, which has many roots competing with tree roots. Thatch in the lawn acts to repel water, and different soil types make water penetration very difficult in many cases. Soaker hoses and root waterers can be useful tools for applying water.

Be sure to apply water during extended winter dry periods. This is vital to good tree health.

 

Soil types: Soils can vary greatly within a short distance. Generally, Front Range soils tend to be clayey and alkaline. However pockets of sandy soils can be found in some areas. You need to ascertain what type of soil you have and take steps, gradually, to improve it. If yours is a clay soil, aeration will help provide oxygen needed for optimum plant health.

Soil nutrients: In general, trees do not need as much fertilizer as do lawns. However, in our generally high pH soils, nutrients, such as nitrogen, iron, zinc and manganese, can be added. Note the color of leaves and needles. If they look sickly or light colored, that is a clue that additional nutrients may be in order. If you are concerned about soil health, you might consider having your soil tested.

By understanding these and other plant needs, you will know how to provide healthy plant care, not only each spring, but throughout the year.

At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

DOES YOUR YARD HAVE A HEALTH PLAN?

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — When is the last time your yard had a check-up? Just like people, plants need periodic examinations and treatments to help prolong their health. Plant health care (PHC) is a vital part of landscape management.

Preventative care, frequent check-ups, early detection, informed decision-making, and routine treatments that provide long term, stable solutions are regular duties of PHC programs. A PHC plan is multi-faceted and customer-driven, focusing on the health, growth, and beauty of a homeowner’s yard.

“It’s like an HMO plan for your yard,” says Jim Skiera, Executive Director for the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). “Adopting a plant healthcare program can prevent problems or keep them from getting serious. When homeowners and professionals work together, everyone benefits. Drastic, costly maintenance can be avoided while the value of the entire property increases.”

The basic premise behind PHC is that if a plant is taken care of properly, natural defenses can be strengthened. Energy that would normally be used up fighting stressful factors can instead be utilized to build up defense systems. Regular check-ups and the removal of hazardous factors from the environment help to improve the health of a plant, the same as they would the health of a human.

Maintaining a Plant Health Care (PHC) Program:

First, choose the right professional support. You would select a doctor carefully, so be sure to select the best professional to assist you in your PHC plan. Experts should ask questions, determine priorities, and discover the homeowner’s expectations. Look for ISA Certified Arborists or certified landscape professionals who are well-trained, educated, and experienced professionals familiar with landscape plants, their needs, and the pests and diseases most likely to attack.

Every yard is different, so individual care is important. Frequent monitoring aids in early detection and is key to the long-term health of plants. Professionals will alert you to any existing or anticipated problems then suggest all possible treatment options and alternatives-just like a doctor would a patient. The best choices usually involve natural processes that are least intrusive. Chemical treatments should be used as a last resort. Homeowners and professionals should work together to decide what is best for the yard.

Expensive remedies are often employed after a yard has already been badly damaged. These practices are often unsuccessful and cost homeowners significant amounts of money in planting and maintenance. Proactive PHC programs cost considerably less than reactive interventions because they help ensure the health and beauty of plants and landscapes, lowering maintenance costs and increasing property values.

“The long-term savings is virtually guaranteed,” Skiera says. “Not only will a plant health care program enhance the well-being of plants, but it also will improve the mood and bank account of the homeowner.”

The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), headquartered in Champaign, Ill., is a nonprofit organization supporting tree care research and education around the world. As part of ISA’s dedication to the care and preservation of shade and ornamental trees, it offers the only internationally-recognized certification program in the industry. For more information visit www.treesaregood.org.

Damaged Trees May Have Monetary Value

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

CHAMPAIGN, IL- While it’s impossible to prevent storms, accidents, and air pollution from causing damage to your trees and plants, it is possible to recapture your landscape losses through an insurance claim, or as a deduction from federal income taxes, advises ISA.

How much are your trees worth? Most likely more than you think. Homeowners invest a lot of time, care, and money into landscaping their property, expecting beauty and shade in return. But the unexpected “return” on that investment is that trees have monetary value as well.

When you stop to consider that landscaping can be worth up to 20 percent of your home’s total property value, you’ll understand why it’s worthwhile to protect the investment you’ve made in your greenery. According to the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), a tree’s value is based on four factors: tree size, tree type, tree condition, and overall tree location based on its functional and aesthetic purposes. A professional tree and landscape appraiser can determine where your trees or plants fall under these categories.

If your trees and landscape are damaged, ISA recommends that you:

  • Contact your homeowner’s insurance company.
  • Have the insurance company send a professional tree and landscaping appraiser out to your property immediately after the damage has occurred.
  • Have the appraiser determine your financial loss, including the cost of removal and repair.
  • Contact a local ISA Certified Arborist if repair or replacement is needed.

Just as you would with any other valuable asset, document your investment in landscaping to help establish its worth. ISA suggests taking pictures of trees and plants while they are healthy to make insurance processing simpler with “before and after” examples.

The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), headquartered in Champaign, Ill., is a nonprofit organization supporting tree care research around the world. As part of ISA’s dedication to the care and preservation of shade and ornamental trees, it offers the only internationally-recognized certification program in the industry. For more information, contact a local ISA Certified Arborist or visit www.isa-arbor.com.

 

LEARN TO RECOGNIZE TREE RISK – Checklist

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

Trees provide significant benefits to our homes and cities, but when trees fall and injure people or damage property, they are liabilities.
Understanding and addressing the risks associated with trees makes your property safer and prolongs the life of the tree.
Trees are an important part of our world. They offer a wide range of benefits to the environment and provide tremendous beauty.
However, trees may be dangerous. Trees or parts of trees may fall and cause injury to people or damage to property.
It is important to assess trees for risk. While every tree has the potential to fall, only a small number actually hit something or someone — a target.

There is no such thing as a completely “safe” tree.
It is an owner’s responsibility to provide for the safety of trees on his or her property. This brochure provides some tips for identifying the common defects associated with tree risk. However, evaluating the seriousness of these defects is best done by a professional arborist. Regular tree care will help identify trees with unacceptable levels of risk. Once the risk is identified, steps may be taken to reduce the likelihood of the tree falling and injuring someone.

Trees and Utility Lines
Trees that fall into utility lines have additional serious consequences. Not only can they injure people or property near the line, but hitting
a line may cause power outages or surges, fires, and other damage. Downed lines still conducting electricity are especially dangerous.
A tree with a potential to fall into a utility line is a very serious situation.
Tree Risk Checklist
Consider these questions:
• Are there large, dead branches in the tree?
• Are there detached branches hanging in the tree?
• Does the tree have cavities or rotten wood along the trunk or in major branches?
• Are mushrooms present at the base of the tree?
• Are there cracks or splits in the trunk or where branches are attached?
• Have any branches fallen from the tree?
• Have adjacent trees fallen over or died?
• Has the trunk developed a strong lean?
• Do many of the major branches arise from one point on the trunk?
• Have the roots been broken off, injured, or damaged by lowering the soil level, installing pavement, repairing sidewalks, or digging trenches?
• Has the site recently been changed by construction, raising the soil level, or installing lawns?
• Have the leaves prematurely developed an unusual color or size?
• Have trees in adjacent wooded areas been removed?
• Has the tree been topped or otherwise heavily pruned?

Defects in Urban Trees
The following are defects or signs of possible defects in urban trees:
1. Regrowth from topping, line clearance, or other pruning
2. Electrical line adjacent to tree
3. Broken or partially attached branches
4. Open cavity in trunk or branch
5. Dead or dying branches
6. Branches arising from a single point on the trunk
7. Decay and rot present in old wounds
8. Recent change in grade or soil level, or other construction

If you identify any of the above issues in your tree, contact us. We will provide a free estimate and consultation.

 

Download this document in PDF form directly from theInternational Society of Arboriculture   tree care website

ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE IS NOW HIRING

ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE LLC is now hiring professional tree arborists to join its winning team!

Please use this form to submit your application. We look forward to hearing from you!

Geoff Mongeon
Owner & Operator.

TREE HAZARDS – final part

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

Defects in Urban Trees

The following are defects or signs of possible defects in urban trees (see figure):

  1. regrowth from topping, line clearance, or other pruning
  2. electrical line adjacent to tree
  3. broken or partially attached branch
  4. open cavity in trunk or branch
  5. dead or dying branches
  6. branches arising from a single point on the trunk
  7. decay and rot present in old wounds
  8. recent change in grade or soil level, or other construction

Defects in Rural Trees

The following are defects or signs of possible defects in rural trees (see figure):

  1. recent site construction, grading and tree removal, clearing of forests for development
  2. previous tree failures in the local area
  3. tree leaning near a target
  4. forked trunk; branches and stems equal in size
  5. wet areas with shallow soil

Managing Tree Hazards

An arborist can help you manage the trees on your property and can provide treatments that may help make your tree safer, reducing the risk associated with hazardous trees. An arborist familiar with hazard tree evaluation may suggest one or more of the following:

  • Remove the target. While a home or a nearby power line cannot be moved, it is possible to move picnic tables, cars, landscape features, or other possible targets to prevent them from being hit by a falling tree.
  • Prune the tree. Remove the defective branches of the tree. Because inappropriate pruning may weaken a tree, pruning work is best done by an ISA Certified Arborist.
  • Cable and brace the tree. Provide physical support for weak branches and stems to increase their strength and stability.
  • Provide routine care. Mature trees need routine care in the form of water, fertilizer (in some cases), mulch, and pruning as dictated by the season and their structure.
  • Remove the tree. Some hazardous trees are best removed. If possible, plant a new tree in an appropriate place as a replacement.

Recognizing and reducing tree hazards not only increases the safety of your property and that of your neighbors but also improve the tree’s health and may increase its longevity!

Ensuring Quality Care for Your Tree

Trees are assets to your home and community and deserve the best possible care. If you answered “yes” to any of the questions in the tree hazard checklist or see any of the defects contained in the illustrations, your tree should be examined by an ISA Certified Arborist. Contact Above and Beyond if you need help with your trees.

TREE HAZARDS – part 1

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

Recognizing Tree Hazards

Trees provide significant benefits to our homes and cities, but when trees fall and injure people or damage property, they are liabilities. Taking care of tree hazards makes your property safer and prolongs the life of the tree.

Trees are an important part of our world. They offer a wide range of benefits to the environment and provide tremendous beauty.

However, trees may be dangerous. Trees or parts of trees may fall and cause injury to people or damage to property. We call trees in such situations hazardous, to signify the risk involved with their presence. While every tree has the potential to fall, only a small number actually hit something or someone.

It is an owner’s responsibility to provide for the safety of trees on his or her property. This brochure provides some tips for identifying the common defects associated with tree hazards. However, evaluating the seriousness of these defects is best done by a professional arborist. Regular tree care will help identify hazardous trees and the risk they present. Once the hazard is recognized, steps may be taken to reduce the likelihood of the tree falling and injuring someone.

Hazardous Trees and Utility Lines

Trees that fall into utility lines have additional serious consequences. Not only can they injure people or property near the line, but hitting a line may cause power outages, surges, fires, and other damage. Downed lines still conducting electricity are especially dangerous. A tree with a potential to fall into a utility line is a very serious situation.

Tree Hazard Checklist

Consider these questions:

  • Are there large dead branches in the tree?
  • Are there detached branches hanging in the tree?
  • Does the tree have cavities or rotten wood along the trunk or in major branches?
  • Are mushrooms present at the base of the tree?
  • Are there cracks or splits in the trunk or where branches are attached?
  • Have any branches fallen from the tree?
  • Have adjacent trees fallen over or died?
  • Has the trunk developed a strong lean?
  • Do many of the major branches arise from one point on the trunk?
  • Have the roots been broken off, injured, or damaged by lowering the soil level, installing pavement, repairing sidewalks, or digging trenches?
  • Has the site recently been changed by construction, raising the soil level, or installing lawns?
  • Have the leaves prematurely developed an unusual color or size?
  • Have trees in adjacent wooded areas been removed?
  • Has the tree been topped or otherwise heavily pruned?

to be continued….

TREE HEALTH – INSECTS & DISEASES (final part)

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

Diseases

Three things are required for a disease to develop:

  • the presence of a pathogen (the disease-causing agent)
  • plant susceptibility to that particular pathogen
  • an environment suitable for disease development

Plants vary in susceptibility to pathogens. Many disease-prevention programs focus on the use of pathogen-resistant plant varieties. Even if the pathogen is present and a susceptible plant host is available, the proper environmental conditions must be present over the correct period of time for the pathogen to infect the plant.

Diseases can be classified into two broad categories: those caused by infectious or living agents (diseases) and those caused by noninfectious or nonliving agents (disorders).

Examples of infectious agents include fungi, viruses, and bacteria. Noninfectious diseases, which account for 70 to 90 percent of all plant problems in urban areas, can be caused by such factors as nutrient deficiencies, temperature extremes, vandalism, pollutants, and fluctuations in moisture. Noninfectious disorders often produce symptoms similar to those caused by infectious diseases; therefore, it is essential to distinguish between the two in order to give proper treatment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Insects

Some insects can cause injury and damage to trees and shrubs. By defoliating trees or sucking their sap, insects can retard plant growth. By boring into the trunk and branches, they interfere with sap flow and weaken the tree structure. Insects may alsocarry some plant diseases. In many cases, however, the insect problem is secondary to problems brought on by a stress disorder or pathogen.

It is important to remember that most insects are beneficial rather than destructive. They help with pollination or act as predators of more harmful species. Therefore, killing all insects without regard to their kind and function can actually be detrimental to tree health.

 

Insects may be divided into three categories according to their method of feeding: chewing, sucking, or boring. Insects from each group have characteristic patterns of damage that will help you determine the culprit and the proper treatment. Always consult a tree care expert if you have any doubt about the nature of the insect problem or the proper treatment

 

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Chewing insects eat plant tissue such as leaves, flowers, buds, and twigs. Indications of damage by these insects is often seen by uneven or broken margins on the leaves, skeletonization of the leaves, and leaf mining. Chewing insects can be beetle adults or larvae, moth larvae (caterpillars), and many other groups of insects. The damage they cause (leaf notching, leaf mining, leaf skeletonizing, etc.) will help in identifying the pest insect.

Sucking insects insert their beak (proboscis) into the tissues of leaves, twigs, branches, flowers, or fruit and then feed on the plant’s juices. Some examples of sucking insects are aphids, mealy bugs, thrips, and leafhoppers. Damage caused by these pests is often indicated by discoloration, drooping, wilting, leaf spots (stippling), honeydew, or general lack of vigor in the affected plant.

Boring insects spend time feeding somewhere beneath the bark of a tree as larvae. Some borers kill twigs and leaders when adults feed or when eggs hatch into larvae that bore into the stem and develop into adults. Other borers, known as bark beetles, mate at or near the bark surface, and adults lay eggs in tunnels beneath the bark.

Treatment

The treatment method used for a particular insect or disease problem will depend on the species involved, the extent of the problem, and a variety of other factors specific to the situation and local regulations. Always consult a professional if you have any doubt about the nature of the problem or proper treatment.

 

TREE HEALTH – INSECTS & DISEASES (part 1)

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

Insects & Disease Problems

Insects and diseases can threaten tree health. As soon as you notice any abnormality in your tree’s appearance, you should begin a careful examination of the problem. By identifying the specific symptoms of damage and understanding their causes, you may be able to diagnose the problem and select an appropriate treatment.

Stress

Basic elements that influence plant health include sufficient water and light, and a proper balance of nutrients. Too much or too little of any of these environmental conditions may cause plant stress.

Environmental stress weakens plants and makes them more susceptible to insect and disease attack.

Trees deal with environmental stresses, such as shading and competition for water and nutrients in their native environment, by adjusting their growth and development patterns to reflect the availability of the resources. Although trees are adapted to living in stressful conditions in nature, many times the stresses they experience in the landscape are more than they can handle and may make them more susceptible to insects and diseases.

Diagnosis

Correct diagnosis of plant health problems requires a careful examination of the situation.

  1. Accurately identify the plant. Because many insects and diseases are plant-specific, this information can quickly limit the number of suspected diseases and disorders.
  2. Look for a pattern of abnormality. It may be helpful to compare the affected plant with other plants on the site, especially those of the same species. Differences in color or growth may present clues as to the source of the problem. Nonuniform damage patterns may indicate insects or diseases. Uniform damage over a large area (perhaps several plant species) usually indicates disorders caused by such factors as physical injury, poor drainage, or weather.
  3. Carefully examine the landscape. The history of the property and adjacent land may reveal many problems. The number of species affected may also help distinguish between infectious pathogens that are more plant-specific as compared to chemical or environmental factors that affect many different species. Most living pathogens take a relatively long time to spread throughout an area, so if a large percentage of plants becomes diseased virtually overnight, a pathogen is probably not involved.
  4. Examine the roots. Note their color: brown or black roots may signal problems. Brown roots often indicate dry soil conditions or the presence of toxic chemicals. Black roots usually reflect overly wet soil or the presence of root-rotting organisms.
  5. Check the trunk and branches. Examine the trunk thoroughly for wounds because they provide entrances for pathogens and wood-rotting organisms. Wounds can be caused by weather, fire, lawn mowers, and rodents, as well as a variety of other environmental and mechanical factors. Large defects may indicate a potentially hazardous tree.
  6. Note the position and appearance of affected leaves. Dead leaves at the top of the tree are usually the result of environmental or mechanical root stress. Twisted or curled leaves may indicate viral infection, insect feeding, or exposure to herbicides. The size and color of the foliage may tell a great deal about the plant’s condition. Make note of these and any other abnormalities.

To be continued…..

Why Topping Hurts Trees? (part 2 – final)

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

Topping Creates Hazards

The survival mechanism that causes a tree to produce multiple shoots below each topping cut comes at great expense to the tree. These shoots develop from buds near the surface of the old branches. Unlike normal branches that develop in a socket of overlapping wood tissues, these new shoots are anchored only in the outermost layers of the parent branches.

The new shoots grow quickly, as much as 20 feet in one year, in some species. Unfortunately, the shoots are prone to breaking, especially during windy conditions. The irony is that while the goal was to reduce the tree’s height to make it safer, it has been made more hazardous than before.

Topping Makes Trees Ugly

The natural branching structure of a tree is a biological wonder. Trees form a variety of shapes and growth habits, all with the same goal of presenting their leaves to the sun. Topping removes the ends of the branches, often leaving ugly stubs. Topping destroys the natural form of a tree.

Without leaves (up to 6 months of the year in temperate climates), a topped tree appears disfigured and mutilated. With leaves, it is a dense ball of foliage, lacking its simple grace. A tree that has been topped can never fully regain its natural form.

Topping Is Expensive

The cost of topping a tree is not limited to what the perpetrator is paid. If the tree survives, it will require pruning again within a few years. It will either need to be reduced again or storm damage will have to be cleaned up. If the tree dies, it will have to be removed.

Topping is a high-maintenance pruning practice, with some hidden costs. One is the reduction in property value. Healthy, well-maintained trees can add 10 to 20 percent to the value of a property. Disfigured, topped trees are considered an impending expense.

Another possible cost of topped trees is potential liability. Topped trees are prone to breaking and can be hazardous. Because topping is considered an unacceptable pruning practice, any damage caused by branch failure of a topped tree may lead to a finding of negligence in a court of law.

Alternatives to Topping

Sometimes a tree must be reduced in height or spread. Providing clearance for utility lines is an example. There are recommended techniques for doing so. If practical, branches should be removed back to their point of origin. If a branch must be shortened, it should be cut back to a lateral that is large enough to assume the terminal role. A rule of thumb is to cut back to a lateral that is at least one-third the diameter of the limb being removed.

This method of branch reduction helps to preserve the natural form of the tree. However, if large cuts are involved, the tree may not be able to close over and compartmentalize the wounds. Sometimes the best solution is to remove the tree and replace it with a species that is more appropriate for the site.

Why Topping Hurts Trees? (part 1)

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

 

Why Topping Hurts Trees

Topping is perhaps the most harmful tree pruning practice known. Yet, despite more than 25 years of literature and seminars explaining its harmful effects, topping remains a common practice. This brochure explains why topping is not an acceptable pruning technique and offers better alternatives.

What is Topping?

Topping is the indiscriminate cutting of tree branches to stubs or lateral branches that are not large enough to assume the terminal role. Other names for topping include “heading,” “tipping,” “hat-racking,” and “rounding over.”

The most common reason given for topping is to reduce the size of a tree. Home owners often feel that their trees have become too large for their property. People fear that tall trees may pose a hazard. Topping, however, is not a viable method of height reduction and certainly does not reduce the hazard. In fact, topping will make a tree more hazardous in the long term.

Topping Stresses Trees

Topping often removes 50 to 100 percent of the leaf-bearing crown of a tree. Because leaves are the food factories of a tree, removing them can temporarily starve a tree. The severity of the pruning triggers a sort of survival mechanism. The tree activates latent buds, forcing the rapid growth of multiple shoots below each cut. The tree needs to put out a new crop of leaves as soon as possible. If a tree does not have the stored energy reserves to do so, it will be seriously weakened and may die.

A stressed tree is more vulnerable to insect and disease infestations. Large, open pruning wounds expose the sapwood and heartwood to attacks. The tree may lack sufficient energy to chemically defend the wounds against invasion, and some insects are actually attracted to the chemical signals trees release.

Topping Causes Decay

The preferred location to make a pruning cut is just beyond the branch collar at the branch’s point of attachment. The tree is biologically equipped to close such a wound, provided the tree is healthy enough and the wound is not too large. Cuts made along a limb between lateral branches create stubs with wounds that the tree may not be able to close. The exposed wood tissues begin to decay. Normally, a tree will “wall off,” or compartmentalize, the decaying tissues, but few trees can defend the multiple severe wounds caused by topping. The decay organisms are given a free path to move down through the branches.

Topping Can Lead to Sunburn

Branches within a tree’s crown produce thousands of leaves to absorb sunlight. When the leaves are removed, the remaining branches and trunk are suddenly exposed to high levels of light and heat. The result may be sunburn of the tissues beneath the bark, which can lead to cankers, bark splitting, and death of some branches.

 

to be continued in part 2…

MATURE TREE CARE – PRUNING (first part)

The International Society of Arboriculture publishes in its tree care website the following guidelines on planning for a beautiful, valuable landscaping for all needs. At ABOVE AND BEYOND – TREE SERVICE we can help you planning your next tree project!  Contact us if you have any questions!

Pruning Mature Trees

Pruning is the most common tree maintenance procedure. Although forest trees grow quite well with only nature’s pruning, landscape trees require a higher level of care to maintain their safety and aesthetics. Pruning should be done with an understanding of how the tree responds to each cut. Improper pruning can cause damage that will last for the life of the tree, or worse, shorten the tree’s life.

Reasons for Pruning

Because each cut has the potential to change the growth of the tree, no branch should be removed without a reason. Common reasons for pruning are to remove dead branches, to remove crowded or rubbing limbs, and to eliminate hazards. Trees may also be pruned to increase light and air penetration to the inside of the tree’s crown or to the landscape below. In most cases, mature trees are pruned as a corrective or preventive measure.

Routine thinning does not necessarily improve the health of a tree. Trees produce a dense crown of leaves to manufacture the sugar used as energy for growth and development. Removal of foliage through pruning can reduce growth and stored energy reserves. Heavy pruning can be a significant health stress for the tree.

Yet if people and trees are to coexist in an urban or suburban environment, then we sometimes have to modify the trees. City environments do not mimic natural forest conditions. Safety is a major concern. Also, we want trees to complement other landscape plantings and lawns. Proper pruning, with an understanding of tree biology, can maintain good tree health and structure while enhancing the aesthetic and economic values of our landscapes.

When to Prune

Most routine pruning to remove weak, diseased, or dead limbs can be accomplished at any time during the year with little effect on the tree. As a rule, growth is maximized and wound closure is fastest if pruning takes place before the spring growth flush. Some trees, such as maples and birches, tend to “bleed” if pruned early in the spring. It may be unsightly, but it is of little consequence to the tree.

A few tree diseases, such as oak wilt, can be spread when pruning wounds allow spores access into the tree. Susceptible trees should not be pruned during active transmission periods.

Heavy pruning just after the spring growth flush should be avoided. At that time, trees have just expended a great deal of energy to produce foliage and early shoot growth. Removal of a large percentage of foliage at that time can stress the tree.

Making Proper Pruning Cuts

Pruning cuts should be made just outside the branch collar. The branch collar contains trunk or parent branch tissue and should not be damaged or removed. If the trunk collar has grown out on a dead limb to be removed, make the cut just beyond the collar. Do not cut the collar.

If a large limb is to be removed, its weight should first be reduced. This is done by making an undercut about 12 to 18 inches from the limb’s point of attachment. Make a second cut from the top, directly above or a few inches farther out on the limb. Doing so removes the limb, leaving the 12- to 18-inch stub. Remove the stub by cutting back to the branch collar. This technique reduces the possibility of tearing the bark.

to be continued…